Real World Rupees

During this week’s Episode of the Question Block Podcast we talked about the prize that we’re giving away for April, which is a downloadable points card for the system of your choice. Shelby asked if Nintendo Points cards were going to work for the 3DS and I said that the 3DS would be using actual money and started rattling off different types of currency. Shelby then mentioned rupees, and was surprised to hear that Rupees were actually a real form of currency, not just used in the land of Hyrule.

The Rupee is the form of currency best well known for being used in India. It’s also the form of currency in Sri Lanka, Nepal, Pakistan, Mauritius, Seychelles, Indonesia, Maldives and formerly in Burma, and Afghanistan.

The word Rupee comes from the Sanskrit work rupyakum, which means “wrought silver” because originally the rupee was a silver coin and has been around in some form since the mid 1500’s. In India it comes in a number of denominations including 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, 50, 100, 500 and 1000 rupees. When writing the term you use the letters Rs. or the symbol you see to the left. Currently one Indian Rupee is worth 2 cents American. The value of a Rupee was originally based on its silver content, which caused some problems when huge reserves of silver were located in the United States and Europe. This caused the value of the rupee to decline significantly.

So sometimes the Question Block will teach you random video game trivia and sometimes it will teach you something about the real world. You never know what you’re going to get with this site. (Conversion courtesy of X-rates.com and current as of 4/8/11.)

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